Blogging – is the HTML keyword meta tag dead?

HTML Keyword Meta tag
HTML Keyword Meta tag

Yes; most of the major browsers will recognize and accept the HTML keyword meta tag.


To the major search engines use the keyword meta tag?

Basically, no. Most of the major search engines simply ignore the HTML keyword meta tag or worse yet simply use it as a means to penalize your site, if they decide the keywords you chose to use do not closely enough relate to your content.

Are the HTML keyword meta tags worth putting a lot of work into?

Short answer, is no. If your intent is doing your keyword research is to create HTML keyword meta-tags, then you are basically wasting your time.

Then what is the value of keywords?

If you think of keyword research is identifying your focus words for your blog article, then there is value in doing keyword research. The value comes not from adding HTML keyword meta-tags, but rather through integrating your keywords ( focus words) into your blog article title, headers, and body content. These focus words can also be added to media metadata and used as part of your tactful repetition approach to content.

Conclusion

For all intents and purposes, HTML keyword meta-tags are useless from a HTML coding standpoint. However doing keyword (focus words) research can be valuable in tuning the language of your blog article to optimize the focus of your blog post.

Related References

Writing an Article vs. Writing a Blog Post:What’s the Difference?

Blog Vs Article
Blog Vs Article

Have you ever wondered what the difference between writing a blog and writing an article is? Today, the words “blog” and “article” are often used interchangeably and almost synonymously, so much that the line between the two is virtually nonexistent. Although the two make up a quality online strategy, blog posts and articles are entirely different.

One of the most common questions is: is a blog considered an article? To answer this, you’ll need to be aware of the difference between blog posts and articles. Blog posts are meant to be posted on a weblog (blog), while an article can be published on any traditional media or digital publication such as a website. Now folks, let us see some of the other difference between article and blog post, shall we?

  • Facts Vs. Personal Opinion

This is one of the biggest differences between article and blog posts. Ideally, an article is supposed to be factual and clear of personal opinion. Article writing should focus more on reporting, providing statistics, facts and information.

On the other hands, blogs posting are generally informal and impersonal in nature. A nice blog should be more conversational, more interactive, casual and should draw in the reader by encouraging them to be more active.

  • SEO Keywords Requirements Vary

Typically, blog posts are meant to rank higher in search engines. They capitalize on SEO keywords to create a more robust SERP that will reach a wider audience. When writing a blog, it is important to take into consideration the use of SEO keywords to create better traction that will have the most significant impact on your digital strategies.

With articles, SEO is not the primary focus and can be quite insignificant especially when they’re not online based. Even when an article is published online, there is less emphasis on SEO keywords.

  • Article Vs. Blog Posts Length and Style

Blog posts are basically short, often ranging from 300 to 1000 words. Blog posts are meant to be quick and snappy and should get the point across in the most concise way. In a generation whose interest in verbose literature has fallen behind, blog posts should take less reader’s time and should be easy to read on the go. They should be written in a more casual tone, that is involving and not overly complicated. Use of slang, sentence fragments, and short paragraphs is accepted in blogging.

On the other hand, articles have no standard length. They can be anywhere between 300 words to 5000 words long. They should have flawless grammar and spelling. Articles follow a more sophisticated, journalistic writing style. They explore a topic in depth, which makes them more extensive.

How and When to Use Articles and Blogs?

Today, businesses looking to grow their online relevance must generate quality content. This may be in the form of blog posts or articles.

Articles are best placed on websites of businesses which need to keep their clients abreast with up-to-date information quickly and regularly. Blog posting is best suited where your goals include an increase in your stature as an industry thought leader, growing your brand recognition and creating better visibility on search engines.

But, really, these rules are not cast on a stone!

Unlike in the past, we are experiencing a blog-article convergence where blog posts are increasingly becoming factual and well researched. We also have longer posts that are going past the SEO keyword needs to create value for the readers. 1,000 (and even 2000) words blog posts have become fairly standard. With new Google algorithms, it is becoming important to create blog posts that deliver more value, are longer and which are more professional.

You can use the different nuances to article writing and blog writing to create a truly robust SERP. You can include both types of content on your website to amp your engagements and SEO.

While their styles may be different, the message conveyed through your article and blog posts should be consistent so that your branding efforts are not sabotaged. Your overall marketing goals and digital marketing strategies will help you determine whether to use blog posts, articles or both.

Related References

5 Basic Types of Blogs

Blogging
Blogging

If you’re new to blogging and are seeking to grow your audience, or have been doing it for a while now, then you understand the challenge of creating unique, compelling, and valuable content for your readers and potential leads. This is, perhaps, one of the main pain points of blogging. So, how can you ensure that you continually produce content that catches the reader’s attention, build their trust, and increase your conversions?

One way is to use different kinds of posts. By varying the format of your delivery, you can take charge of how well the content resonates with your readers/audience. This post will look at the different categories of blogs, their main characteristics and how you can use the various types of blog content to inspire variety on your website or blog.

Let’s dive in!

5 Different Types of Blog Content to Inspire Your Blogging!

  1. Long-Form Article

Long-form articles are blog posts with more than 1200 words. However, depending on your niche, long-form article length is slowly increasing, with 3000-10000 becoming the new standard. This is a lot more than the 350-600-word articles that have always been used.

But, why the shift?

In the recent past, there has been a significant increase in content saturation and competition on the blogosphere. To meet the needs of their end user, Google implemented an algorithm that prioritized on quality and value, so that quality content would rank on top.

These new changes brought new challenges and opportunities. By having an emphasis on white hat SEO best practices, practices such as keyword stuffing were no longer relevant. Instead, the search engine now prioritized on length, quality and value.

Therefore, if you’re looking to rank highly on Google and grow a vibrant identity, you’ll need to invest in quality long-form articles that must deliver more value than other competing blogs. This way, Google bots will use length as a quality factor, besides crawling through your article for the appropriate keywords.

Why use long-form articles?

  • Long-form posts are great for SEO
  • Long-form articles are increasingly getting shared, hence will increase your brand recognition
  • Long-form articles will raise your conversion rates.
  • Long-form content will position you as an authority in your niche areas.
  1. Instructional/how-to blog posts

Since most of the internet users are looking for some solution online, how-to posts can drive massive organic traffic to your site. They are easily shareable and deliver real value to your audience. This means that you can be able to reach your target audience without too much hassle since they are relatively easy to write.

Use a clear and concise heading mixed with short but detailed subsections. Since instructional posts are becoming popular, be sure to choose a less obvious, more niche-focused area for your blog posts.

  1. News Story

People love to read news. If you’re looking to drive more traffic to your site, you can publish a news post. A great tactic to use is newsjacking’ that aims at taking advantage of current events that are news-worthy.’ You can weave in your opinion into the existing news story to create truly engaging content.

News posts are highly beneficial as they provide current raw information to your readers. Since they’re factual, they will present you as a leading authority in your space. We all want that. Right?

  1. First-Person Narrative

These are personal stories that engage your readers emotionally. A huge benefit of the first-person narrative is that you never really know what aspect will touch, inspire and motive your readers. If you’re promoting a business, think of ways you can make the company or brand seem real, humanized and more approachable. You can do this by telling a story about a customer’s experience or interviewing someone in/out of the company.

For a personal blog, weaving in some personal experience and how you overcame the challenges will work magic on your readers. Such posts done once in a while will create personal connections and ardent followership to your blog.

  1. Listicle

Listicles are always among the most shared blog posts on the internet. You can create a list on just about anything: from your best summer reading list to a list of your favorite eateries in your town; or it could be perhaps a list of your favorite web applications or 10 brilliant lead generation ideas. The possibilities are endless.

Lists are a great read and a must-have in your blog because:

  • The title tells you what to expect from the onset
  • You always know how much is left• They are easy to skim through
  • They can break a complex topic into digestible chunks without coming out as boring or verbose.
  • They’re easy to plan and write
  • They’re great for targeting core keywords
  • Updates can be easily made
  • Smaller listicles can be adapted to suit long-tail keywords.

So there you have it!

Use these kinds of posts to make your blog or website engaging and vibrant. The key here is to make sure that the reader’s expectations are met while still maintaining some level of variety that is truly rewarding.

Related References

 

An Author’s Introduction to RSS Feed/News Sites

Internet news and web RSS
Internet news and web RSS

The information age is fantastic, but there’s only one problem: too much information. It’s very difficult to keep track of your favorite blogs, sports, and news without some help. One of the ways to achieve this is by using RSS sites writers.

What is RSS News Feed?

RSS stands for Really Simple Syndication. It’s a type of web feed that enables you to keep track of your favorite websites, such as online magazines and blogs. It consists of computer-readable files known as XML files, which automatically update information.

Previously, to keep track of your website updates, you were to bookmark websites in the browser and manually get back to them frequently to find out whether there were any updates. But browser bookmarking had its share of downsides.

The problems with browser bookmarking

  • As a web user, you were to do the entire work. You were to access a website, find out how relevant its information is to you. If it had useful information that you could read often, or it had significant, frequently updated information, you could bookmark it and look for the bookmark from time to time.
  • Tracking many websites can be daunting. As you continue scouring the internet, you’ll come across hundreds of websites with valuable information daily. If you bookmark most of these sites, it becomes a bit tricky to track all of them, as it’s overwhelming.
  • You can miss information whenever you forget to check out your bookmarks.
  • Some websites don’t update their information, and thus, you’ll end up seeing the same old information every time.

How to know whenever a website runs an update?

Well, this is precisely what RSS feeds list does. It allows you to receive relevant, up-to-date information, delivered to you on the fly so you can read it at your own time. This saves time and gives you the information you want as quickly as it’s published

How RSS Works?

RSS feeds work almost like an email. When you subscribe to the feeds, you’ll realize that the unread entries from the websites you’re tracking are marked bold. Once you click on them, you will be able to see the most recent update, which you can read right from the feeder. You can either click to be directed to the actual website, or move on to another unread item, and this marks the previous one as read.

What problem does RSS solve?

Many people are interested in many sites whose content keeps changing unpredictably. Examples of such sites include news sites, medical websites, information pages for religious and community organizations, product information websites, and weblogs. Frequently visiting a website to find out whether there’s any new information can be tiring.

Earlier on, email notification was a solution to this problem. However, when many sites send you email notifications, they are typically disorganized, overwhelming, and can easily go to the spam folder.

With RSS, you can be notified of any new or changed information. Handling notifications to many websites is easy. Also, the results are presented in a well-organized way, entirely distinct of email.

How to Integrate an RSS Feed To My Writers’ Blog

Many websites are built on a content management system (CMS), and each CMS comes with a default RSS feed. You can easily find the RSS feed for your writers’ blog. The easiest way is to add /feed toward the end of a URL, which should look like yourdomain.com/feed.

You can also do this for individual web pages on your blog to obtain specific RSS feeds. After that, follow the following steps:

  • Download an RSS reader, also referred to as an aggregator. There are numerous commercial and free readers, apps and extensions available on the web. Download one of them to your mobile device or computer.
  • Copy your blog’s RSS feed created/found earlier to allow you publish to a RSS news feeds.
  • Paste the RSS web address into the RSS reader you’d downloaded earlier.
  • Your readers can now subscribe to your blog’s RSS feed

How to Market my book on RSS feed News Sites

To market a book to RSS feed news sites, you should:

  • Create a landing page on your blog with information about your new book, what it contains, the value it adds to the readers and more. Include the price as well. The landing page should provide links to all those retail outlets that have your book.
  • Search for sites with RSS feed in a niche related to the title of your blog. Those sites have probably thousands of readers who’ve subscribed to their updates.
  • Contact them for an opportunity to create a guest post, a press release or any other content whose topic should be related to your book in a way, and also resonate well with the site you want to publish to. You can check out a few of their posts to know what works well for their audience.
  • Create the content and include links to your landing page. If it’s published, it will appear in the RSS feed of that website, and the subscribers will see the update and read it. Interested ones may click on the links and access your book.

Popular RSS New Readers

There are several RSS readers, and you might want to test a number of them to establish the right one for you. Most RSS readers offer a free version and a premium version. Here are some of the popular ones:

  • Feedly for the web: – Android and iOS
  • Feeder for Chrome: – Android and iOS
  • Panda for the web: – iOS and a Chrome extension
  • Reeder 3 for iOS and Mac
  • Forté Agent for windows

Sampling of RSS Feed Resources for Authors, Bloggers, And Writers

Authors, bloggers, and writers can subscribe to many RSS feeds.

For authors:

  • Feedspot
  • Book News Feed
  • Top Reader Reviews
  • BookBrowse Blog
  • BookBrowse Member Ezine
  • Bookbrowse Free Newsletter

For Writers and bloggers

Freelance Writing Jobs RSS Feed

  • FreelanceWriting RSS Feed
  • Freelance Writing Riches RSS Feed
  • Make A Living Writing RSS Feed
  • Be a Freelance Blogger RSS Feed
  • Reddit-Freelance Writers RSS Feed
  • Daily Writing Tips RSS Feed
  • The Write Life RSS Feed
  • Writers in Charge RSS Feed
  • All Freelance Writing RSS Feed

Final words

Whomever you are a writer, author, or blogger, it’s important that you leverage on the potential of RSS feeds whether it’s on your own website for your readers to subscribe or on other sites for your own inspiration and promotion of your digital products.

Related References

 

The Parts of A Printed Book

The Parts of A Printed Book
The Parts of A Printed Book

It’s important to know that there’s a set order in the elements that make up a book. Books have standards which one should follow in order to have it published via the traditional or self-publishing route.

You’ll need to prepare the different parts of a book in an acceptable structure. The basic anatomy of a book is as follows- the Front Matter, the Body Matter, and the End or Back Matter.

  • Front Matter is put before readers get access to the core content of your book.
  • Body Matter is the core content of your book.
  • End or Back Matter may contain optional content or materials, all of which may be optional.

Order Of The Parts Of A Book

The Front, Body and End Matter make up the “essential bits” of an official book recognized by publishers around the world. Each of the following major elements may be made up of its smaller components, which are as follows:

Front Matter

Front Matter should be included in all books. This is the part where the author puts some preliminaries before the actual book content is revealed, and where the book’s nuts and bolts and publication details such as the ISBN, publisher name, author name, and Library of Congress are contained.

Typically, the front matter has about nine different parts, but it should be noted that not all books must have the nine parts. The first three elements are the Half Title, the Frontispiece, and the Title Page. Then, a Copyright page takes form, and a Table Of Contents is added in if it’s necessary.

Pages that make up the Front Matter are counted but they aren’t numbered (you can see this when you look at the Copyright or Title page). If the publisher decides to put in a track of some sort, then they’ll number it with Roman numerals.

The Half Title Page (Optional).

  • The Half Title part is shown after the cover of your book, and this reveals the title of the book. This section got its name as your title will be printed right in the middle, or the “halfway point” in the page.

The Blank ,  Ad Card, or Other Works (optional).

  • The Other Works page shows other books written by the author, or if the book is part of a series.

The Frontispiece (Optional).

  • The Frontispiece may be placed on the left-hand side of the book’s page after the half-title and usually contains a picture or an image. Frontispieces are usually employed in fiction books as they call up a scene in the story. The artwork will be shown on the left page (known as Verso), directly opposite the right page that has the Title (known as Recto).

The Title Page.

  • Your Title Page should show the full title of your book, along with subtitles, the author’s name, and any affiliations, i.e., publishers or the company who printed your book. Title pages are normally put on the recto side, facing the Frontispiece.

The Copyright.

Copyright is an essential part of any book. This part of the book will outline legal information about who has the rights to the content contained in the book. The Declaration of Copyright will state the name of the person(s) who own the book’s content (the author). Additionally, this is the part where the author gives credit to illustrators, indexers and the editorial staff who have helped illustrate, edit or publish the book.

The Copyright may have copyright acknowledgments and publisher notes if the author has made some mentions of references, i.e., excerpts, quotes, song lyrics, and reprinted material.

The book’s edition can be found at the Copyright page. You’ll be able to see the Edition Number and Printing details, i.e., if the book is listed as First Edition, then it means that it’s the first time that that particular content was published and made into a book. This is optional, as authors and publishers may or may not disclose the fact that the content is in First Edition. In other cases, the Edition Number may be a graphical representation, and a First Edition can be shown as 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 in the Copyright page, while a Second Edition can be shown as 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2.

If the book was published in the United States, then it will contain a Library of Congress Catalog Number.

Copyright Acknowledgments (If not at Back Matter). This is mainly for books that have permission or reprinted material. Authors must cite their sources and give credit to extracts from books, artwork or song lyrics.

Dedication (Optional).

This page shows you who the author wrote the content for. The writer honors a special individual or a group of people, usually writing “To (Name of Close Friends, Loved Ones or Colleagues).

Epigraph (Optional and If not in Body Matter).

Is an inspiration or summarizing concept phrase, poem or quotation.

The Table Of Contents

One of the most recognized and vital parts of any book, the Table Of Contents serve the main purpose of outlying the map for the reader. This Front Matter section shows the reader what’s included in the book, i.e., the chapters, the sections and headings and part listings where appropriate. Textbook and non-fictions normally list the primary heads per chapter, which is called 1-heads or A-heads.

Foreword (Optional).

The Foreword is a preliminary setup for the book, written by a colleague, a field expert or someone who has written similar content. Forewords mostly serve as a marketing ploy where an eminent or well-established author gives the writer added credibility when pitching the book to shops and stores.

Preface (Optional).

May contain the following elements:

  • The Editor’s Preface
  • The Author’s Preface
  • The Forward, Preface and Acknowledgments

A Preface is a part of the book where the author explains why he or she wrote the book and how the content came to be. Prefaces may be used to solidify an author’s credibility to the subject matter on hand by sharing professional indications or experiences they used to create the said book.

Forewords and Prefaces

Forewords and Prefaces are optional parts in a book and may come in separate pages in the Front Matter, labeled with Roman numerals i, ii, iii, etc. beginning with the opening page leading to the Body Matter.

Acknowledgments (Optional, can be part of the book’s Preface)

Acknowledgments are a Front Matter section where the author gives thanks to people who gave their talent, resources and time in relation to completing the book. Individuals who helped the writer or gave him or her inspiration may be cited here as well.

Most acknowledgments are placed in the Back Matter to preserve interest. Prefaces can contain both Old and New content, and if this happens, the New Preface is listed first.

Introduction (Optional)

The Introduction section reveals the contents of the material. The author can choose to simply show what’s covered in the book or go to great lengths in setting the book’s tone by establishing preferred methodologies and definitions that the reader should follow once they get to the body.

Writers of scholarly fields can use an Introduction as a guide to readers within their own profession on how the book should be consumed (within or as part of a discipline).

Other Parts of the Front Matter

List of Illustrations (Optional).

This part can be divided into different types such as maps, figures, etc.

List of Tables (Optional).

May include family trees or genealogical parts for reference. Placement may either be on the front or at the end.

Abbreviations (Optional, or in the Back Matter)

Chronology (Optional, or in the Back Matter)

Contains a list of events that help the reader.

Body Matter

Body Matter should consist of the core content, sometimes referred to as the Core content. Core content may be divided into their respective sub-fields called Chapters. Authors may divide bigger pieces of core content by using Parts, then Sections and finally Chapters, and in that order.

Introduction (Optional and if important to the succeeding text).

In many books, the core content will have the introduction.

Prologue.

Most commonly found in plays but are quite rare in non-fiction genres. Novels can contain lengthy prologues before the actual story begins.

Prologues show events, scenes or acts that precede the main content in the book. It could serve as a transitional act to the main act on hand; it can also start in the midst of a hectic turn of events. Writers can create prologues that serve as pivotal moments. One rule of having a prologue is that if the author has included a prologue, then the book should have an epilogue as well.

Epigraph (Optional, on the Copyright page, Title or Chapter Titles).

This part may contain a poem excerpts, short quotations, and phrases that set the tone and the atmosphere of the book.

Core Content or Body of Book

Core Content or body of the book is the core writing and content of a book and may be segmented with  Parts, Sections, and Chapters.

Parts, Sections, and Chapters

Parts, Sections, and Chapters serve as breaks that divide up the book’s content by topic. For the reader, these elements make for the digestible division of content.

Body Matter is divided by Arabic numerals starting with Number 1 at the first page of Chapter 1. Each chapter will have its own headings which are about 2-3 levels deep. Chapters that have similar content are usually grouped under a Section or Part. Sections may contain several Chapters that have relations with each other. Parts will have Sections that contain related content. When authors organize their manuscripts, they must have a loose outline from where they can arrange the ideas and writings to guide the reader seamlessly from start to end.

Epilogue (More common in plays and fiction books)

Epilogues are the closing stories in fiction books. They can serve as the final chapter and reveal what happened after core content has concluded. Here, the author can tie up loose ends or hint at the next story or sequel.

This part can include comments that provide additional insight into the book’s events. Readers may want to know what happened after the story concluded. Authors can throw a sort of follow-up into the Epilogue to satisfy their readers or leave them wanting more.

Afterword.

A short note on how the book came to be or how the story was written based on an idea.

Postscript.

Additional information about the content after the story ends.

Conclusion.

The author sums up the concept and the ideas presented in the book. Found in non-fiction genre more than fictional ones.

End-Matter / Back-Matter

End Matter is content that can be found after the Main content. All Back-Matter content are Optional. Some books may have the following Back Matter:

Glossary.

Contains a list of terms that were used in the book. The terms are arranged in alphabetical order and given meanings or definitions to help the reader. Glossary entries may be characters or places and are best suited for long-form fiction.

Bibliography or Reference List

Non-fiction books can put a Bibliography at the Back Matter to state the sources used in the completion of the book.

Index(es).

This part lists all major references that were used in the book, including major topics and key influences, and shows in what page they could be found.

Acknowledgments

Acknowledgments (Before or After the Bibliography part, which may have additional credits)

Appendix,

Appendices or Addendum. Extra or updated information that can be found within the Body.

Chronology (If not placed at the Front Matter).

Contains a list of events that help the reader. This part is sometimes added to the Appendix.

Notes or Endnotes.

Material that’s organized per chapter and presented in a progressive manner throughout the stage of book writing.

Abbreviations (If not found at the Front Matter)

List Of Contributors.

People who have helped the author in creating and finishing the book.

Illustration Credits (If not located in Captions).

Errata

Generally, a notice of correction to previously published content.

Colophon.

Notes regarding general information, typography or design in regard to book production.

Author’s Bio.

About the author and, usually, found at the back flap or the last page of the book. Here, any blacklist or upcoming titles are mentioned. May also have a call to action to visit the author’s social network or website.

Related References